Liana Apostolova, MD, MSc
Photo: Liana Apostolova

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317-963-7436

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Elected 2024

Dr. Apostolova is the Associate Dean of Alzheimer’s Disease Research, Distinguished Professor in Neurology, and the Barbara and Peer Baekgaard Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research at Indiana University School of Medicine. Dr. Apostolova has made important contributions to the imaging and imaging genetics biomarker fields. Her work has generated fundamental insights into the biomarker changes in AD, unraveled heritable risk factors of sporadic AD, and shed light on overlooked disease-associated mechanisms. Her reputation as a world leader in AD research led to her becoming the principal investigator of the largest NIH grant ever received by a scientist at IU - the Longitudinal Early-onset AD (EOAD) study (LEADS). Her LEADS foundational work explores the unique features of early-onset and atypical AD yielding novel insights into the mechanisms, heterogeneity, and heritability of AD which could serve as a blueprint for developing new treatments. Widely recognized as a leader in AD research, Dr. Apostolova was appointed as the Editor-in-Chief for AD Diagnosis, Assessment, and Disease Monitoring in 2021 and elected as a standing member of the FDA Peripheral and Central Nervous System Advisory Board Committee in 2022. Dr. Apostolova has authored or co-authored over 150 scholarly articles (cited more than 15,000 times; h-index 56). Among her awards are the 2010 AFAR‐GE Healthcare Junior Investigator Award for Excellence in Imaging and Aging Research, the 2010 AAN Research Award in Geriatric Neurology, the 2013 Dorothy Dillon Eweson Lectureship in Aging Research, and the 2019 Alzheimer’s Association de Leon Prize in Neuroimaging, Senior Scientist Category. She was elected as a Fellow of the American Academy of Neurology in 2015 and is a founding member of the ADRD Therapeutic Workgroup responsible for the development of appropriate use recommendations for the newest monoclonal antibody treatments for AD.